The 20 Most Extreme Cases Of ‘The Book Was Better Than The Movie’

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“The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 2” rolls into theaters this weekend, and if there’s one thing I’m not looking forward to it’s the inevitable “I liked the movie, but it wasn’t as good as the b…

Source: The 20 Most Extreme Cases Of ‘The Book Was Better Than The Movie’

Goosebumps

  I had the personal joy last Friday night of watching the new Goosebumps movie with my third grader and his friend. Now people, I have a stark confession I must admit, I have never read a goosebumps book before. Mostly because I was half way through High School when the first book was released and partly because I had already found Stephen King. Anyhow, I thought to myself, perhaps some of you have not either and would like a little 101 on R.L. Stine and his popular series.

Goosebumps is a series of children’s horror fiction novellas by American author R. L. Stine, published by Scholastic Publishing. The stories follow child characters, who find themselves in scary situations. From 1992 to 1997, 62 books were published under the Goosebumps umbrella title. Various spin-off series were written by Stine: Goosebumps Series 2000, Give Yourself Goosebumps, Tales to Give You Goosebumps, Goosebumps Triple Header, Goosebumps HorrorLand, and Goosebumps Most Wanted. Another series, Goosebumps Gold, was never released. Goosebumps has spawned a television series and merchandise, as well as a feature film, starring Jack Black as R. L. Stine.
Since the release of its first novel, Welcome to Dead House, in July 1992, the series has sold over 350 million books worldwide in 32 languages. Individual books in the series have been listed in several bestseller lists, including the New York Times Best Seller list for children.

How about this movie?

  Plot: After moving into a small town of Greenland, Maryland, a teenage boy named Zach Cooper (Dylan Minnette) meets Hannah (Odeya Rush), his new neighbor. Hannah’s father, R.L. Stine (Jack Black), who writes the Goosebumps stories, keeps all the ghosts and monsters in the series locked up in his books. When Zach unintentionally releases the ghouls and the monsters from the storybooks, Zach, Hannah, and Stine team up in order to put the monsters back where they came from, before it’s too late.

VIEWPOINTS: “The Girl on the Train” By Paula Hawkins

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Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. “Jess and Jason,” she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost.

And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and becomes inextricably entwined in what happens next, as well as in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good?

Intersecting, overlapping, not-quite-what-they-seem lives. Jealousies and betrayals and wounded hearts. A haunting unease that clutches and won’t let go. All this and more helps propel Paula Hawkins’s addictive debut into a new stratum of the psychological thriller genre. At times, I couldn’t help but think: Hitchcockian. From the opening line, the reader knows what they’re in for: “She’s buried beneath a silver birch tree, down towards the old train tracks…” But Hawkins teases out the mystery with a veteran’s finesse. The “girl on the train” is Rachel, who commutes into London and back each day, rolling past the backyard of a happy-looking couple she names Jess and Jason. Then one day Rachel sees “Jess” kissing another man. The day after that, Jess goes missing. The story is told from three character’s not-to-be-trusted perspectives: Rachel, who mourns the loss of her former life with the help of canned gin and tonics; Megan (aka Jess); and Anna, Rachel’s ex-husband’s wife, who happens to be Jess/Megan’s neighbor. Rachel’s voyeuristic yearning for the seemingly idyllic life of Jess and Jason lures her closer and closer to the investigation into Jess/Megan’s disappearance, and closer to a deeper understanding of who she really is. And who she isn’t. This is a book to be devoured. -Neal Thompson

Instant #1 New York Times Bestseller

“Nothing is more addicting than The Girl on the Train.”—Vanity Fair

“The Girl on the Train has more fun with unreliable narration than any chiller since Gone Girl. . . . [It] is liable to draw a large, bedazzled readership.”—The New York Times

“Like its train, the story blasts through the stagnation of these lives in suburban London and the reader cannot help but turn pages.”—The Boston Globe

“Gone Girl fans will devour this psychological thriller.”—People

“ The Girl on the Train has more fun with unreliable narration than any chiller since Gone Girl. . . . The Girl on the Train is liable to draw a large, bedazzled readership too. . . . The Girl on the Train is full of back-stabbing, none of it literal.”—Janet Maslin, The New York Times

“ The Girl on the Train marries movie noir with novelistic trickery. . . hang on tight. You’ll be surprised by what horrors lurk around the bend.”— USA Today

“Like its train, the story blasts through the stagnation of these lives in suburban London and the reader cannot help but turn pages. . . . The welcome echoes of Rear Window throughout the story and its propulsive narrative make The Girl on the Train an absorbing read.”— The Boston Globe

“[ The Girl on the Train] pulls off a thriller’s toughest trick: carefully assembling everything we think we know, until it reveals the one thing we didn’t see coming.”— Entertainment Weekly

For more review click on the Amazon link below: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1594633665/ref=s9_al_bw_g14_ir15?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=merchandised-search-4&pf_rd_r=1EZP0VEREPHPA7XR0WVS&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=2274311442&pf_rd_i=13128468011&tag=bisafetynet-20

Weekend Read: Philip K. Dick Short Story Bonanza!

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Hello weekend and hello readers!
The weather is starting to turn and with the falling of leaves brings cooler weather, hot soups, football games, and lazier times. For me that means I’ll be book in hand more often than not.

What will you be reading this fall-like day? Do let me know because I am always looking for something for the next weekend.
I’ll tell you what I am reading. As a kid I was enamoured with the movies Total Recall, Blade Runner and then later in life Minority Report. I never thought to ponder whether these were screenplay’s or books made into movies. A few weeks ago I stumbled onto the Author Philip K. Dick and I came to the self-realization that not only did he pin these movies but he has hundreds of more. Science fiction, action-packed, short stories to feed your imaginative void!! So that is what I will be reading. Check Philip K Dick out!
I’ll leave you with his bio and these words: stay safe and enjoy the getaway from reality!
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Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and philosopher whose published works mainly belong to the genre of science fiction. Dick explored philosophical, sociological, political, and metaphysical themes in novels dominated by monopolistic corporations, authoritarian governments, and altered states of consciousness. In his later works, Dick’s thematic focus strongly reflected his personal interest in metaphysics and theology. He often drew upon his life experiences in addressing the nature of drug abuse, paranoia, schizophrenia, and transcendental experiences in novels such as A Scanner Darkly and VALIS.[1] Later in life, he wrote non-fiction on philosophy, theology, the nature of reality, and science. This material was published posthumously as The Exegesis.

The novel The Man in the High Castle bridged the genres of alternate history and science fiction, earning Dick a Hugo Award for Best Novel in 1963.[2] Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said, a novel about a celebrity who awakens one day to find that he is unknown, won the John W. Campbell Memorial Award for best novel in 1975.[3] “I want to write about people I love, and put them into a fictional world spun out of my own mind, not the world we actually have, because the world we actually have does not meet my standards,” Dick wrote of these stories. “In my writing I even question the universe; I wonder out loud if it is real, and I wonder out loud if all of us are real.”[4]

In addition to 44 published novels, Dick wrote approximately 121 short stories, most of which appeared in science fiction magazines during his lifetime.[5] Although Dick spent most of his career as a writer in near-poverty,[6] eleven popular films based on his works have been produced, including Blade Runner, Total Recall, A Scanner Darkly, Minority Report, Paycheck, Next, Screamers, The Adjustment Bureau and Impostor. In 2005, Time magazine named Ubik one of the hundred greatest English-language novels published since 1923.[7] In 2007, Dick became the first science fiction writer to be included in The Library of America series.[8][9][10][11]

REVIEW: Forget Tomorrow

imageI had the distinct honor of reading first time Author Pintip Dunn’s new book, Forget Tomorrow. This past Tuesday, November 3rd, the book hit stores nationwide and has already gathered quite a following. Personally speaking I blazed through the pages in a matter of days and could probably be considered one of Mrs. Dunn’s new groupies. The story-line was fast paced, mysterious, and grabs you from the very start. Simply put: I loved it! With that being said let’s push aside all of the blushing school boy banter and dig into the book.

SPOILER ALERT BEWARE!
This Dystopian story is set in a futuristic world where every boy and girl at the age of 17 gets their future. Said future could be that you are destined for fame as an actress, athlete, a world renowned chef, or perhaps, as in the main characters point of view, a criminal. In Callie’s vision, she sees herself murdering her gifted younger sister. Horrified by this revelation she sacrifices everything to ensure her sister safety. Taking dangerous risks, tempting fate, and willing to change her future, Callie will stop at nothing.

What young reader would not find this fascinating and at the same time just a little bit scary? Heck, a glimpse of your future at any age would probably be pretty startling.

Anyhow, I digress. Before Callie can process what the memory means, she is arrested and placed in Limbo―a hellish prison for those destined to break the law. With the help of her childhood crush, Logan, a boy she hasn’t spoken to in five years, she escapes.

(Wait a second. Have I neglected to mention that people in the future have elevated abilities such as telekinesis and possibly teleportation?)

Fleeing from a government that is researching and collecting individuals with these abilities, the young duo ends up in a community that protects the weak and hunted. Here Callie learns about the plights and stories of other victims and other facts drive her to formulate a plan to save her sister.

Without revealing too much of the story I leave you with this: If I could say anything to convince you to read this book it would be the shocker of an ending. I thoroughly enjoyed the refreshing conclusion and applaud the authors direction. If you are looking for cliffhangers then check out Forget Tomorrow. I give this book 5 out of 5 stars.

Stay tuned readers, the next book in this series is called Remember Yesterday. The release date is scheduled for October 4, 2016 by Entangled Teen.

Find out more here: http://www.entangledpublishing.com/forget-tomorrow/

USA Today calls this YA sci-fi a “must-read” and Buzzfeed.com says it will have you “on the edge of your seat!”

Author: Pintip Dunn
When her first-grade teacher asked her what she wanted to be when she grew up, Pintip replied, “An author.” Although she has pursued other interests over the years, this dream has never wavered.
Pintip graduated from Harvard University, magna cum laude, with an A.B. in English Literature and Language. She received her J.D. at Yale Law School, where she was an editor of the YALE LAW JOURNAL.
Pintip is represented by literary agent Beth Miller of Writers House. She is a 2012 RWA Golden Heart® finalist and a 2014 double-finalist.
She lives with her husband and children in Maryland.

*Disclosure: This book was provided to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. No other compensation was given and all opinions are my own.*